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New Year’s Eve Fireworks and Lanterns


Date: 24th December, 2018

New Year’s Eve is just around the corner and Dorset & Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service is issuing advice to the public to ensure celebrations across the counties are safe and enjoyable.

It’s a popular night for fireworks displays and so it’s really important that members of the public consider their safety when using fireworks. If they are holding one in their garden we would always recommend attending a public display as these are safer.

Fireworks are safe if you use them properly. Here are some simple steps to make sure that everyone has a good time without getting hurt:

Another popular activity on New Year’s Eve is using Chinese lanterns, also known as wish or flying lanterns, as these carry a significant risk of fire or injury if not used wisely. The lanterns are generally made from paper, supported by a wire frame that incorporates a holder at the base for a solid fuel heat source.

Group Manager Richard Coleman said: “With Chinese lanterns, you’re basically throwing a naked flame into the sky with no control over the direction it will take or where it will land – in addition, there is no guarantee that the fuel source will be fully extinguished and cooled when the lantern eventually descends.”

Further advice on the use of Chinese lanterns can be found at www.dwfire.org.uk/chinese-lanterns

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