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Latest Incidents

26th July, 2017 - 10.52pm: Verwood - A crew from Verwood were called to a vehicle on fire followi...Read more

26th July, 2017 - 9.40pm: Shaftesbury - A crew from Shaftesbury attended a small vehicle well al...Read more

26th July, 2017 - 7.02pm: Bournemouth - A crew from Westbourne attended a road traffic collision...Read more

26th July, 2017 - 6.08pm: Bournemouth - A crew from Westbourne attended a small butane propane m...Read more

26th July, 2017 - 3:08pm: 2 crews from Poole went to Limbelost to a RTC car into a hedge with on...Read more

26th July, 2017 - 11:35am: Trowbridge and Bradford on Avon went to a paper recycling bin fire on ...Read more

26th July, 2017 - 07.29am: Crews from Malmesbury and Royal Wootton Bassett extricated one female ...Read more

26th July, 2017 - 7:29am: Malmesbury and Royal Wootton Bassett went to an RTC where a female pas...Read more

26th July, 2017 - 6.52am: Swindon - Shed fire in Cullerne Road, one hose reel used to extinguish...Read more

26th July, 2017 - 4.44am: Wingfield - Fire involving hay in a barn. Two hose reel jets, drags an...Read more

Landlords’ obligations

Landlords in the housing sector have certain legal obligations with regard to fire safety and the safety of people who live in their premises.

Fire safety must be considered against the potential risks posed by different types of buildings and their uses. For example, a building comprising of purpose-built flats will present a different risk to residents and other users than one which has a mixture of commercial and residential lettings.

Legislation requires landlords to carry out fire risk assessments of their properties. This process will identify any fire hazards that exist, who is at risk, and what needs to be done to remove or reduce that risk.

These responsibilities extend to premises that have no landlord – e.g. flats with common areas where flat owners are jointly regarded as ‘responsible persons’ and need to ensure legislative requirements are met and maintained as a co-operative.

The Fire Safety Order creates a legal entity known as the ‘responsible person’. If you are the owner, manager, agent or you own a flat within a block, you will need to check if you are the responsible person.

If a person has a contractual or tenancy obligation for the maintenance, repair or safety of a premises, they can be regarded as a person with control of the premises and therefore acquire responsibility relating to the extent of that control. It should, however, be understood that the responsible person has an absolute duty to comply with the Fire Safety Order.

The responsible person must not wait to be directed to act by the enforcing authority. As with health & safety legislation, ignorance of the law is no excuse for non-compliance.

 

 

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