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Latest Incidents

19th January, 2021 - 03:29am: At 03:29 fire control took a 999 call from an occupant of a house in L...Read more

18th January, 2021 - 8.08pm: Ambulance Control requested attendance of DWFRS at a two vehicle RTC a...Read more

18th January, 2021 - 7.10pm: A crew from Swindon were mobilised to a report of tyres and rubbish on...Read more

18th January, 2021 - 6.41pm: DWFRS Fire Control received an emergency call to flooding in a propert...Read more

18th January, 2021 - 1520hrs: Multiple crews attended a fire in high rise property fire in Bournemou...Read more

18th January, 2021 - 1059: Fire involving a 2 floor building 10m x 20m. Severe fire damage to gro...Read more

17th January, 2021 - 15:00: Westlea responded to an alarm activation at a residential property in ...Read more

17th January, 2021 - 14:41: Springbourne and Christchurch out to reports of a fire in a property, ...Read more

17th January, 2021 - 12:32: After receiving numerous calls about thick black smoke from an unknown...Read more

17th January, 2021 - 12:48: Cranborne and Verwood attended an RTC involving one vehicle. Two peopl...Read more

Service Control Centre operators

Our Service Control Centre operators act as a link between members of the public and operational firefighters and officers.

Their main role is to answer 999 calls, when they use our radio scheme and computer-aided mobilisation system to dispatch resources to the emergency and make sure adequate cover is maintained across the Service area.

The nature of emergency calls means that Control Centre operators sometimes deal with people in very stressful situations – as such, they have to remain calm, be understanding and tactful, and empathise with the caller, whilst making sure that they gather all the information needed to supply the right help.

As we always need to be prepared for emergency situations, our Control systems are constantly monitored. Staff have to do daily tests of communication equipment to identify any faults and make sure all of our databases are kept up to date with information that we may need.

Control Centre operators work on a shift system, split into four ‘watches’ covering 24 hours a day, 365 days of the year. They work an average of 42 hours a week on a pattern of two days then two night duties followed by four days off.

 

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