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21st February, 2018 - 10:23pm: Crews from Swindon attended a fire involving a cooking utensil that ha...Read more

21st February, 2018 - 7:50pm: Crews from Salisbury attended a chimney fire at a property in Westbour...Read more

21st February, 2018 - 6:06pm: Two appliances from Pewsey and Amesbury, and an aerial appliance from ...Read more

20th February, 2018 - 6:39pm: 2 Crews from Weymouth Fire Station a fire in a property in Chapelhay H...Read more

20th February, 2018 - 3:44pm: 2 Crews from Devizes Fire Station and 2 officers respond to a domestic...Read more

20th February, 2018 - 2:17pm: A crew from Corsham Fire Station attend alarms at Waverley Court, Cors...Read more

20th February, 2018 - 2:15pm: A crew from Swindon Fire Station attend a premises in Chamberlain Road...Read more

20th February, 2018 - 9:52am: A crew from Redhill Fire Station attend a fire in the open  on Ashley ...Read more

20th February, 2018 - 9:25am: A crew from Blandford Fire Station have attended a premises in Hedding...Read more

20th February, 2018 - 3.31am: Walcot - One crew from Swindon mobilised to reports of a vehicle on fi...Read more

Chinese lanterns

Chinese lanterns (also known as wish, sky or flying lanterns) have origins that go back thousands of years, and they have become increasingly popular as a way of celebrating weddings, birthdays, anniversaries or other special events.

However, there is a high risk of fire from using such lanterns, either through incorrect handling, unspent fuel cells or unexpected flight patterns.

The lanterns are generally made from paper, supported by a wire or card frame that incorporates a holder at the bottom for a solid fuel cell. The paper outer may or may not be fire retardant. Flying times suggested by manufacturers vary from 6-8 minutes and up to 20 minutes, with achievable heights claimed to be up to one mile.

Whilst lighting and launch are largely in the control of the user, the actual flight path and ultimate destination are generally not. There is also no guarantee that the fuel cell will be fully extinguished and cooled when the lantern eventually descends, and any subsequent contact with a combustible surface could result in a fire developing.

It is best to avoid using Chinese lanterns if you are near:

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