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Safe by the Water

It is really fun to play in, on or near water. But we all have to be careful, even if we are good swimmers! 

Lilly and Tim and their family have been having more fun and adventure on their days out. The award-winning actress Zoë Wanamaker CBE has kindly read “Safe by the River” for you to listen to.  You may know her better as Madam Hooch who teaches Harry Potter to fly at Hogwarts or Martha who looks after the children in “Five Children and It” or Lady Bloomsbury Barton in “Worzel Gummidge”.  Listen as Zoë reads Safe by the River and tells us about Tim, Lilly and their family and their trip to the river which turned into an unexpected adventure. You can read the story yourself here. 

Sharron Davies MBE is a swimmer who has won lots of medals for her swimming, including at the Olympics! She knows how important it is to be safe around water, especially at the seaside. Listen to Sharron read the story of Safe by the Sea and see how you can enjoy a safe day at the seaside like Tim and LillyYou can read the story yourself here.

Thank you so very much to Zoë and Sharron for reading the stories.  

The main safety messages from the stories are:  

It is very important to always THINK before you go into water or if you are playing near water. Make sure an adult knows and tells you that it is safe before you go near the water.

 

 

If you get in trouble in the water; you fall in or become unsure when you are swimming you must FLOAT. Lie on your back with your face so you can see the sky then spread your arms and legs out like a starfish. When you are calm shout for help.

 

 

Never go into the water to rescue someone – call 999 and ask for the coastguard if at the seaside or the fire and rescue service if inland. Encourage them to float on their backs and if you can, without putting yourself in danger, throw them something that floats to hold onto.

 

 

Dogs are very good swimmers. Most of the time dogs will be able to get out of the water. If they really can’t the firefighters will help.

 

 

 

 

Although it may look fun, you must be very careful jumping into water, as you don’t know how deep the water is, or what is beneath the water. Water is very cold and if you jump in suddenly you can get “cold water shock”. You need to enter the water carefully when an adult tells you it is safe.

 

 

As well as the water you need to be careful of the land around the water. Rocks and stones can fall off cliffs above you, and banks can give way and you fall in the water. Never go near cliffs with danger signs.

 

 

Although it may seem fun, inflatables are not safe at the beach. The tide and wind can quickly and unexpectedly float you out to sea!

 

 

 

It is safer to go to a lifeguarded beach if you are going to go swimming in the sea. Check on the RNLI website for a list of beaches with lifeguards. https://rnli.org/find-my-nearest/lifeguarded-beaches

 

 

 

 The lifeguards will have flags up to show you the safe area to swim. Always swim between the red and yellow flags. To find out more about what the beach flags mean and how to stay safe at the beach visit https://rnli.org/

 

 

You may not be able to go to the seaside now because we all need to be C19 heroes and keep ourselves safe from the virus. But if you are lucky to be able to visit a safe beach where you can stay 2 metres away from other people, you need to be extra specially careful because the lifeguards are not able to be at all the beaches they normally are. In the story the lifeguards Ann and John explain to Tim and Lilly the importance of going to a lifeguarded beach and swimming between the red and yellow flags. If there are no flags then there are no lifeguards and so if you go near the water everyone needs to be very careful.

Fun activities for you to do:

If you can’t go to the beach you could make your own! Ask an adult to help you to make one area the “beach” and one area “the sea”. You could put a blanket down and have a picnic on your “beach”. Use building blocks to build “sandcastles”. Make or find some sea creatures to find. Firefighter Paul has lots of art and craft activities for you to do in Make and Glue. Maybe you could make a fish or a crab for your pretend beach.  You could put them in a pillow case and pretend they are in a rock pool and “fish” them out. Don’t forget to put them back in the “water” when you have had a look! You can then go for a pretend swim. Why not make some flags to remember to swim between them? Practice your FLOAT move so you know what to do if you ever get in trouble in the water.

Here are some fun activities for you to do when you have listened or read the stories.

Colouring sheets:

Sharron Davies MBE who read Safe by the Sea for you has won lots of medals for her swimming, including at the Olympics. She knows how important it is to be safe near, in and on water; and she also knows it is important to eat healthy foods and stay fit. Her favourite sport is swimming. What is your favourite sport or activity to keep fit and active?  Would you like to do our Firefighter challenges? We have lots of different firefighters telling you about their favourite heathy foods and exercises. Can you do their firefighter challenges?

 

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